What are you doing to plan ahead for intense I-5 lane closures this August?

Thursday, March 1, 2007

On February 21 we announced a 24/7 closure of several lanes of northbound I-5 from Aug. 10 to Aug. 29. During these closures crews will replace failing bridge expansion joints and repave the freeway from Spokane Street to I-90 just south of downtown Seattle. And on top of that we'll periodically close ramps in the project area, including the on-ramp from Spokane Street and the exit to I-90.

As you know, this is one of the busiest section of I-5 in the state and the closures could create monstrous backups. While we are working with local communities, businesses and transit agencies to help keep traffic moving during construction, we expect lengthy backups and significant delays.

We can only do so much to keep traffic moving. The math is pretty simple. During the first half of the 19-days we expect to close two of five lanes, cutting freeway capacity by 40 percent. In the second half we'll close three of five lanes, shrinking capacity by 6o percent. We need a corresponding amount of drivers to divert off I-5 just to get to normal traffic conditions. Throw in an collision or two or a stalled vehicle during the morning rush hour and that equation goes out the window. And don't forget the city streets and other alternate routes. They could be jammed as well.

The bottom line is, we're in this together and we need your help to get through these 19 days in August. We announced these closures six months in advance so drivers, transit users, businesses and other organizations have time to prepare for what's coming.

Below we've listed some of the steps drivers can start taking today to ease your commute and help other drivers. If you're a driver, what ideas work for you?

  • Plan a vacation between Aug. 10-29
  • Consider arrangements to carpool or vanpool
  • Practice taking the bus or train
  • Make arrangements to work from home or alternate worksite
  • Discuss altering your work schedule to come in earlier or later than normal
  • Try alternate routes
  • Keep up to date on the project by subscribing to WSDOT’s I-5 Seattle E-mail Alerts and by bookmarking WSDOT’s project Web page

Employer and organizations who rely on workers starting on time or can't afford packages and shipments showing up late also need to get ready. Think about what steps you can take and let us know what you're going to do.

We'll keep this blog alive through construction. We'll post regular updates, answer your questions and listen to your suggestions. We'll also be updating the project Web page regularly. For example, we just posted a Frequently Asked Questions page. There you will learn more about why this work is necessary, why a 19 -day closure is the smart choice and much, much more.



51 comments:

Anonymous said...

too bad you can't shift lanes over to the northbound side, the good thing is I won't have to travel this segment often, but I do drive on 599 so I can imagine all this new diversion traffic is going to wreck havoc on the 1st Ave Bridge interchange (if you can even call it an interchange). Will any of the lights down there be retimed or bridge openings delayed so that there aren't mile-long backups on 599?

Greg Phipps said...

Those are good questions. Let me ask our project team and I'll get the answers posted soon.

Greg

Anonymous said...

I'm gonna buy an espresso cart and porta potti and patrol the traffic back-ups for a captive audience. $2.00 mochas and $5.00 to use the facilities!

Seriously, though. I'm just avoiding having to travel during the peak periods.

Anonymous said...

Is there any way that Sound Transit can add trains during construction? It would take some negotation with the railroad plus they might have to lease extra equipment, but this is a great time for Sound Transit to showcase its service.

Erin Stuber, WSDOT Communicator said...

Great comment about Sound Transit. WSDOT has been working with Sound Transit and persuaded them to add a seventh car, now already rolling across the tracks. Discussions are under way to add an eighth car, and we’ll continue to post new information about increased train capacity to the project Web site.

Anonymous said...

19 days is an aggressive construction schedule for the length of the proposed repair areas. Can you guarantee that the awarded contractor will be able to meet this schedule with enough crew, and have they been asked to consider this in their efficiency work plan? Delays are common in construction---within reason, has potential undiscovered conditions or problems been surveyed, anticipated, and factored in to the 19 day schedule? what are your delay day allowances? realistically.

Jim Farris, WSDOT engineer said...

You bring up some great questions.

Yes, delays and unexpected conditions can cause construction schedule problems. But, we are making every effort to try to minimize these risks by:

Providing financial motivation: We are offering the contractor a $100,000 per day incentive (up to $500,000 maximum payout) for early completion, and $100,000 per day disincentive if the contractor does not complete the northbound I-5 work in 19 days. The contractor can also incur other penalties of varying amounts for keeping ramps or additional lanes closed beyond the times allowed in the contract.
Developing careful staging strategy and scheduling: This project has received tremendous attention to staging and scheduling. WSDOT examined dozens of ways to complete this construction work while keeping traffic moving. A value engineering study (a focused effort by construction experts outside the immediate design team) concentrated specifically on how the project could be staged. The design team used the study’s recommendations and collaborative efforts with our construction engineers to formulate our staging strategy and schedule.
Collecting contractor input: We collaborated with the contracting community to develop a concentrated work schedule. This condensed work schedule will make it easier for contractors to recruit, train and retain staff for the duration of the construction project.

Proactively searching for unexpected conditions: We examined the bridge deck, expansion joints and a large portion of the road surface for necessary repairs. We also opened up an expansion joint to check the underlying conditions. Prospective contractors will tour the site before bidding on the project. We continue to monitor the condition of the joints and bridge deck to avoid any unforeseen problems prior to construction this August.

Timing the work to coincide with good weather: While weather is always a risk, we scheduled the project in August, which is statistically our best bet for dry weather in Seattle. In addition, August offers the fewest conflicts with major summer events and lower workday traffic volumes.
We can’t control Mother Nature, but we are making contingency plans to keep the project moving forward during unexpectedly wet or cold weather.

Our schedule is aggressive but achievable. We will work closely with our contractor to minimize risks and be ready for the unexpected. We will also keep the public informed about our progress during construction. If we slip behind schedule, we will let the public know and will do everything we can to get back on schedule.

Jim Farris, WSDOT engineer

Anonymous said...

I read in the West Seattle Herald that there may be construction closures (evenings and weekends)throughout spring and summer, not just August. Is this true? As a West Seattle resident who commutes to the north end on weekends, I would really appreciate more information. From what I've read on the WSDOT website, the only closures will be in August. What can we really expect? Thanks.

Washington State Department of Transportation said...

Thanks for asking a great question.

Project specific information can be found at the project web page. But if you don't find what you are looking for there, check out our weekly construction reports, or visit our frequently updated traffic page.

Greg Phipps said...

Anonymous asked about evening and weekend closures this spring and summer.

We don't have an exact schedule because we don't yet have a contractor. However, we expect southbound I-5 lane and ramp closures begining in June and ending in early October. These will be OVERNIGHT closures.

There will be no lane or ramp closures southbound during the 19-day closure in August.

Northbound I-5 lane and ramp closures will begin in July and continue into late September. These also will be overnight closures.

We do not expect any full weekend lane or ramp closures other than the 19-day, Aug. 10 to Aug. 29 closure.

Anonymous said...

I agree with the suggestion that the 1st Ave Bridge openings be delayed to help with the extra traffic that will most definitely be on 99/599 during construction. What about at least insuring something like a no-opening rule for those days during peak travel times of 7am-10am and 4pm-7pm?

Greg Phipps said...

We are also concerned with slowdowns caused by 1st Avenue S. bridge openings. With this in mind we worked with the US Coast Guard to extend the hours when openings will be restricted.

The Coast Guard will notify mariners that drawspan openings will be restricted between 6 a.m. and noon, and between 1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays between Aug. 13 and 29.

MARS said...

I-5 Bridge deck
Short site planning again. The new light rail is nearing completion. Why not wait for it. Is it possible the new light rail cannot accommodate the big crunch of riders? You also mention taking the train. That’s great if you reside south of Seattle commuting Downtown. How come creative train rescheduling is not being performed? There are no trains running southbound out of Seattle in the AM? Adding cars for what train? There is no relief from N. Seattle to S. Seattle. Trains run from Tacoma to Seattle or Everett to Seattle. I'm not seeing any alternative mapping on your site showing routes and changes being made to roadways picking up the overflow, why not wait till the last minute so the confusion and traffic snarls will be all the greater. What about Seattle Traffic Control have the presented any ideas? Why not build a temporary movable transport structure to allow cars to pass over the construction site and reroute all the Trucks.
The solutions presented by Washing DOT are the same old saw. Just put up with it you have no choice.

Greg Phipps said...

Sound Transit's light rail line will open in July 2009. In 2009 work will be under way on early safety and mobility improvements for the Alaskan Way Viaduct and Seawall Replacement Project. Because this work will affect traffic on SR 99 it will be crucial to have as many lanes available as possible on I-5. We're doing the I-5 work now to avoid viaduct-related construction and construction scheduled for I-405 in 2008. I think you'll agree this was smart planning on our part. For more information on the early viaduct work visit www.wsdot.wa.gov/projects/Viaduct and click on the "read more" link in the second bullet of the project status box.

Also, you mention that our advice to take the train won't help those who travel from north Seattle to south Seattle. The I-5 project will only affect northbound I-5 during the day so there is no project-specific need to add train service southbound out of Seattle in the morning.

Finally, we have provided alternate route maps on our project Web site at www.wsdot.wa.gov/Projects/I5/
SpokaneStreetBridgeRepair/AlternateRoutes

Greg Phipps
WSDOT Communications

Anonymous said...

101 Metro bus route, when heading Northbound mornings (onto West Seattle Bridge towards Spokane/E3 Busway), will Airport Way be used instead of this normal route? Same question, heading Southbound afternoons, from downtown Seattle towards Spokane/E3 Busway.

If Airport Way will be used, would it be for both directions, or can you confirm one direction only, and if so, which direction?

I'm surprised Metro still doesn't know, and why no one else has asked. Thanks in advance.

Greg Phipps said...

We have been working with Metro Transit since late last year to coordinate bus reroutes for this project. Metro will soon be publishing the reroute info on its Web site, but I can give you a sneak peek of what will happen to 101 going northbound:

Instead of getting on northbound I-5, the 101 will go east on Boeing Access Road, north on Airport Way to Lander Street, east on Lander Street to the SODO Busway and north on the SODO busway into downtown.

There will be a dedicated transit/truck lane on northbound Airport Way. There will be no southbound reroute because the southbound work will occur at night in late July/early August.

Anonymous said...

I understand the Puget Sound is expecting catastrophic traffic during this closure. Why hasn't this information been in the media more? Posting information on the Wash DOT website certainly doesn't reach many freeway drivers.

Wayne Dyck said...

WSDOT response, from Greg Phipps, WSDOT Communications:

We have been working with local communities for nearly a year to prepare for this construction closure and are planning a full-court press with news reporters leading up to the 19-day closure on northbound I-5. We are working to generate media coverage about the closure every week up to Aug. 10 with increasing intensity in the final days before the closures begin. Our goals are to let every driver and bus and train rider know about the closure and to convince 50 percent or more of the drivers to help us reduce the number of vehicles on I-5 during the closure, particularly during rush hours.

We are strategically timing our media blitz so it will occur early enough that people can plan ahead but not so early that drivers forget or news reporters get tired of the story. Nighttime lane closures starting July 9 give us the news hook we need to help ensure the widest possible news coverage. Experience has shown us that without the immediacy of a news hook it’s difficult to get the kind of media coverage that we’ll need to get drivers’ attention. We’ll then roll out fresh news during the weeks leading up to and through the closure to keep the media coverage going.

During the past nine months we have conducted extensive, mostly grass-roots, outreach though we have received media coverage. We held a major media event in February that resulted in extensive coverage by most of the news outlets in town. We also received coverage after we announced the selection of our contractor in May. Our grass-roots outreach, while not covered by the mass media, have also been reaching key audiences. Media relations and Web site postings are a small but important element of this outreach, which has also included, for example:

· presentations to more than 60 neighborhood, transportation and employer groups and e-mails or phone calls to 150 community, transportation, emergency responder, tourism, employer and other groups who didn’t choose to meet with us
· project information at WSDOT booths at more than 50 fairs and festivals
· project information packets mailed to the 700 largest employers in King County and another 290 employers in Seattle with materials to help them notify their employees
· posters delivered to more than a thousand businesses and gathering places
· door-to-door visits or phone calls to more than 160 businesses in the Georgetown and SODO neighborhoods of Seattle
· an insert in the West Seattle Herald
· notification in King County Metro transit timetables and rider alerts

Thanks for giving us the chance to outline the extensive work we’ve been doing to get the word out about the project. Look for more media coverage starting the week of July 9.

Greg Phipps
WSDOT Communications

Anonymous said...

My vanpool wonders if HOV lanes going to remain to encourage sharing rides?

MGC said...

I hope the detours will be properly engineered; and not randomly decided by inexperienced people in comparison to Seatac Airport construction work. Yesterday (07/08/07) I recently returned a rental car back to Seatac Airport; the roads were dangerous.

Anonymous said...

With the closures of the Columbian Way on-ramp, that leaves Beacon Hill with only one I-5 on-ramp (Swift/Albro), which will put the cars right into the construction backup. Beacon Hill residents will have even less ways off of the Hill than we have now. During this construction, will the rolling light rail street closures off of the east side of Beacon Hill across MLK Way S be halted so that access of of the Hill is not further compromised? Also, will light rail construction on MLK Way be halted so that MLK Way can be used as a viable detour?

Anonymous said...

I live in Des Moines and my baby is due to be born Aug. 24th. This is my first baby and I'm nervous that I will not make it to my doctors on time for delivery. What is the best route to get to Swedish Medical and what would you expect the time frame to be for this commute.

Anonymous said...

Will there be any traffic officers to assist businesses along Airport Way to ensure ingress and egress where there are no traffic signals?

Anonymous said...

Are you going to designate one of the 2 or 3 lanes that will be opened through the area as transit and vanpool/carpool only? You should reward those making the effort to use public transit and vanpool/carpool solutions with a lane that has less congestion to get through the area. This may also result in long term transit/vanpool usage. If these open lanes are a free for all, then that is very poor planning on the part of WSDOT.

Anonymous said...

What is the best way to get from West Seattle to Edmonds?

Anonymous said...

Go to your home page, or construction page, for being this big of a headache you sure make information on your site difficult to find if you don't know the name of the project. Doing this at the peak month of tourist travel is a stroke of genious. Highest ADT weeks of the entire year and for all intensive purposes your shutting down the only real way to get through Seattle..what moron engineer came up with this plan...

Anonymous said...

#1 Why can't you wait until after LABOR DAY to start this project?

Wouldn't it be easier with everyone back from vacation, airports less busy, schools in session, and everyone back to work. Then you would be dealing mostly with the regular commuter traffic that has knowledge of side roads and alternative routes to get around, unlike the unaware travelers and those that are unfamiliar with the area getting stuck in traffic.

Already I have heard many that will not be going to the zoo, Seattle Center, Waterslides & other attractions to avoid the conjestion caused by the I-5 Project.

#2 I live in Bellingham and must see a doctor in Tacoma at 4pm on August 13th. Please tell me what will be the best route to take and how long it will take me as I can't miss this appointment. Thanks for whatever you can provide

Anonymous said...

I understand that the West Seattle Water Taxi may be increased to 1/2 hour during rush hour. Can you get the waterfront bus to coordinate times so that people can get from the Seattle dock to other areas? Right now, it is usually a long wait to get the bus.

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
My vanpool wonders if HOV lanes going to remain to encourage sharing rides?

July 6, 2007 4:38:00 PM PDT

Lanes in the construction zone are going to look very different then they do today. When we say we are going to keep at least two lanes open through the construction zone during peak travel times we are talking about narrowed ten foot lanes that will be re-striped in different configurations throughout the 19 days of closures.

Because of the need to keep the lane configurations flexible we will be unable to mark out an HOV lane through the construction zone. However, there still is a great incentive to carpool during these closures because the HOV lane will still travel north from the Pierce County line to Michigan Street. This will help carpools avoid back-ups south of the construction zone and still provide a more reliable route during construction.

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
With the closures of the Columbian Way on-ramp, that leaves Beacon Hill with only one I-5 on-ramp (Swift/Albro), ... Also, will light rail construction on MLK Way be halted so that MLK Way can be used as a viable detour?

July 10, 2007 5:09:00 PM PDT

We are working closely with Sound Transit to minimize construction closures as best we can while still keeping Sound Transit on schedule to deliver light rail to the area. However, there will be other ways to get off Beacon Hill during the closures than just Swift/Albro. I would recommend either traveling north through your neighborhood and taking city streets over to downtown and accessing I-5 northbound from there or using the Columbian Way on-ramp detour that we will set up during the closures. The detour will take you down 4th Avenue and onto the new SR 519 ramps and then back to northbound I-5. While these options may take more time they will put you ahead of the construction closures.


July 9, 2007 10:56:00 AM PDT

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
I live in Des Moines and my baby is due to be born Aug. 24th... What is the best route to get to Swedish Medical and what would you expect the time frame to be for this commute.

July 12, 2007 2:51:00 PM PDT

This trip is more difficult to plan because the exact time of delivery is unknown. I would recommend familiarizing yourself with a variety of alternate routes to the hospital even driving some of these beforehand so you feel more comfortable. Northbound SR 509 to northbound SR 99 or International Boulevard/Pacific Highway are two routes that could take you from Des Moines into Seattle. Mapquest.com is a good resource to map out a route from your home to the hospital. Click on the advanced option “avoid highways” to see options other than I-5.

Depending on the time of day, these alternate routes could be more or less congested. We will post as much real-time traffic information as we can on our Web site during the closure so I would check the Web and listen to radio traffic reports quickly before deciding which route to take the day of arrival. Just in case, it would be a good idea to look up emergency facilities near you if there is massive gridlock on the freeway and alternate routes that day and you need to see a medical professional immediately. I would check with your doctor to see if there is anywhere they would recommend.

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
Will there be any traffic officers to assist businesses along Airport Way to ensure ingress and egress where there are no traffic signals?

July 16, 2007 9:36:00 AM PDT

The city of Seattle will be adding a traffic signal to the intersection of 13th Ave. S. and Airport Way S. to help traffic access the roadway. This additional traffic signal along with the traffic signals that already exist will create gaps in traffic that will allow drivers access to the roadway at other locations. However, in general you should still add some extra time to your travel plans because it will take longer for you to access Airport Way S. due to heavier traffic during construction.

-Lauren

Anonymous said...

I take the last 57 from West Seattle at 8:12 in the morning to 1st Ave S in SODO. I don't see any mention of possible back-ups approaching the West Seattle Bridge. I tried to check the FAQ, but got an error message.

Although there is a bus lane on the bridge eastbound, when there is a back up, it can take a long time for the bus to get down Admiral and under the bridge and invariably it also gets delayed by traffic preventing it from accessing the cut out bus stop (near Chelan) and the on-ramp to the bridge. Can something done to give the bus better access to the bridge during this construction? Failing that, can their be more buses to and from the water taxi with improved freqency and coordination?
Thanks!
-Bruce

Anonymous said...

Since you will be losing the HOV from 1-5 construction zone, could you make the right lane of 1st Ave (alternate route) HOV during rush hour?
Thanks again,
Bruce

Mike said...

Has any consideration been given to re-routing the Fauntleroy Ferry traffic directly to downtown as opposed to West Seattle? I drive the West Seattle Bridge every morning and the majority of the vehicles crossing eastbound are heading to I-5 North.

Instead of creating another headache, could this traffic be diverted to the downtown terminal where it would then disperse to I-5 and other destinations?

Anonymous said...

Would you please stop giving side street as the best option possible for people? It is probably the worst option. Give a suggestion of taking public transportation. Also would you advertise taking public transportation will give advantage to commuter instead of giving awful image of "Last resort" option?

Anonymous said...

I was wondering what the official time of the closure is going to be (11:00pm?)? I will be traveling through Seattle on August 10th and want prepare accordingly.

Anonymous said...

Do you anticipate highway 167 traffic flow being affected by this project?

Anonymous said...

What about those of us that work downtown and live on the eastside... Will there be much spillover into southbound I5 between the city and I90? Can we expect larger delays in peak times or will we be able to slip through?

Thanks for staying so diligent replying to the comments on this blog. It's greatly appreciated.

Anonymous said...

I live in Auburn and work in Redmond. It would take 3 - yes, 3 Metro busses to get to my work in the morning, but then I'm still stuck at a P&R about 2 miles from my work, with no way to get there! What alternates do south-siders have, when we have to get to the east side? I will carpool as much as possible, but that's my only alternative and my carpool partner is not available every day... Anyone who drives on 405 is scared of the traffic that will be redirected there.

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
What is the best way to get from West Seattle to Edmonds?

July 17, 2007 11:26:00 AM PDT

One of the best ways to keep informed about the best route to take during construction is to bookmark our project Web page and check it regularly, as we are constantly adding new information and tools for drivers: www.wsdot.wa.gov/projects/I5/spokanestreetbridgerepair. Also, look for a new traffic page devoted entirely to this project coming soon. You’ll be able to view traffic cameras on I-5 and alternate routes and get up-to-date information on current traffic conditions.

I would recommend planning a few different routes you could take from West Seattle to Edmonds and then checking the Web and listening to local media before heading out the door.

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...

#1 Why can't you wait until after LABOR DAY to start this project?

#2 I live in Bellingham and must see a doctor in Tacoma at 4pm on August 13th. Please tell me what will be the best route to take...

We can not wait until after Labor day to start the project because we need the good weather provided in August to complete this weather sensitive work. Also August has the lowest traffic volumes and the lowest transit usage of any month. After Labor Day schools start up, Seahawks games begin in full force and people return from vacation which increases the traffic in the region again.

In answer to your second question, the round the clock lane closures are only in the northbound direction. You may want to map out several different routes for your return trip. Listen to local radio as you approach Seattle to determine what the best route would be. Plan on your return trip taking more time by filling up your gas tank, packing some snacks and water and having a cell phone charged if you have one.

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
I take the last 57 from West Seattle at 8:12 in the morning to 1st Ave S in SODO...Can something done to give the bus better access to the bridge during this construction?

Metro transit has re-routed many of their buses to avoid the construction zone on I-5 and potential delays. Check Metro’s Web site for re-route information: http://transit.metrokc.gov/up/rr/reroutes.html#construction

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
Since you will be losing the HOV from 1-5 construction zone, could you make the right lane of 1st Ave (alternate route) HOV during rush hour?

We will designate the right lane of Airport Way S. as a truck and transit lane for trucks, buses and vanpools only. Carpoolers will still have an advantage during the closures because the HOV lane will be available on I-5 up to Michigan Street, just before the construction zone.

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
I was wondering what the official time of the closure is going to be (11:00pm?)?

The around the clock lane closures on northbound I-5 will start at 10 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 10. Ramp closures could start as early as 7 p.m.

-Lauren

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
Do you anticipate highway 167 traffic flow being affected by this project?

We do expect there to be more traffic on SR 167 northbound as drivers take alternate routes to avoid the I-5 construction zone. I would recommend giving yourself some extra time to get to your destination, especially during the first few days of construction to see what other drivers will do.

-Lauren

Anonymous said...

Why aren't large trucks banned from I-5 during the 5 am to 11 am time period? It seems to me that they could travel better during the night hours. I also understand that they are illegal if they are in any lanes except the two right hand lanes. Where is the state patrol when these huge rigs are in the left hand lanes traveling at 75 mph. This is a daily occurance and the police seem to be more interested in catching speeders or HOV violators than getting these rigs into the correct lanes.
Also, why aren't the HOV lanes opened to all cars during this huge mess?

Lauren Penning said...

Anonymous said...
I understand that the West Seattle Water Taxi may be increased to 1/2 hour during rush hour. Can you get the waterfront bus to coordinate times?

King County Metro Transit announced yesterday that they have added an additional run in the morning at 6:10 a.m. on the water taxi during the I-5 lane closures. Also, each taxi will be able to accommodate 100 more riders during the closures. Metro will provide additional shuttle service to and from the water taxi. Check their Web site for more details: http://transit.metrokc.gov/tops/oto/water_taxi.html

-Lauren Penning

Anonymous said...

I think the earlier comment about the train service was correct. Though train service has been added south out of Seattle, the point was there is no way a person can commute from points north of Seattle in the morning to points south of Seattle, and return the same way in the afternoon, unless you travel I5 or other street routes. If you really wanted to decrease street traffic, perhaps one of the solutions would be for Sound Transit to run a train from Edmonds to Tacoma in the morning, and the reverse in the afternoon. The commuter trains are wonderful, but remain very downtown commute-centric, never having allowed for people who do not work in downtown.

Anonymous said...

What will the impact be for the morning Bellevue to Seattle commute? The ramps to I-5 from I-90 are north of the construction zone but will there be any residual effect?

Anonymous said...

How can I get to West Seattle from 99 heading N? Is there an exit?

 

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