We asked and you told us ... how did we do?

Monday, December 11, 2006

As Co-Director of Maintenance and Operations for WSDOT, I want to say that I appreciate the time and effort people put into their responses to our question posted last week on this blog. It was a simple question, “How did we do?” While it was a very challenging week for all of us at WSDOT, we read every comment – all 75 – as we debriefed and compiled our "lessons learned" process after last week's storm.

As we all reflect back on the storm, one key thing keeps coming up. Events such as the one from last week with a significant amount of snow and ice on a large number of roads in western Washington quickly exceeds the work that can be done with the amount of equipment available to us for this purpose. This is simply the reality that we face. It would not be cost effective to have the amount of people and trucks available to be everywhere all at once.

About half of the comments we received from you were supportive of the efforts we provided. The other half clearly indicated that you thought we could have done better. While I personally was pleased with much of our effort (this was the third week of our crews working 12-hour shifts around the clock) there are certainly some things we need to be doing differently in the future.

  1. As many of you mentioned, we need to do a better job getting up to date information to people that may be stuck in their vehicle in an event. As such, we will be modifying our use and reliance on our Highway Advisory Radios (HARs). While limited in their range, these devices can be an effective tool for getting information to you.

  2. We need to work more closely with media (specifically radio stations) to emphasize critical areas at more frequent intervals during events, even if that is during non-typical traffic reporting times.

  3. Many of you suggested that we consider using salt to de-ice the roads. I can plainly say that we have been (and will continue to be) aggressively using anti-icers on the roads throughout the entire area affected by the storm. While we don’t have an exact number quite yet, we used more than a thousand tons of anti-icers from Seattle to Bellingham fighting this storm. Statewide for a given winter we may use as much as 20,000 tons to 30,000 tons of anti-icers as part of our snow and ice removal program. Anti-icers are an important tool and we will continue to expand our use of them in the future.

  4. We are developing more creative ways of applying anti-icer to the road ahead of snow events in the urban areas. We already monitor the weather forecasts and in some instances, pre-apply anti-icers to the roadways a number of hours ahead of the predicted snow. However, in order to accomplish this, drivers must recognize that we may impact the overall flow of traffic at a time when it may not be clear what we're up to. For instance, this may mean that at 11:30 a.m. we may be driving down I-5 at 30 mph with our plow trucks, applying rock salt to the roadway in anticipation of a pending snowstorm. In some cases, we may spread the anti-icer and the snow may not occur.

  5. We are investigating creative ways to access locations such as the SR 522/I-405 interchange from different directions. For instance, we might drive plows southbound to the interchange in the northbound lanes, against the normal flow of traffic. This is not a simple thing to do, given the amount of traffic and the necessary precautions that would need to be taken. We have to work very closely with Washington State Patrol and others so that we can accomplish this in a safe manner, as we do not want to make an already challenging situation worse by endangering either you or our employees.

  6. We are in the process of evaluating additional locations to stage both anti-icers and sand to assure they are strategically located in the right places so we can respond as quickly and effectively as possible.

In addition to the changes outlined above, we are still in the process of looking at our response to the storm in very minute detail. Within the next few weeks, we anticipate more items to add to the lessons learned that we will be implementing in the future.

Sincerely,

Chris Christopher

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I missed the opportunity to post a comment earlier.

This is more a Metro Transit problem than DOT: Articulated buses should be pulled to the side of the road and parked at the first sign of ice or snow. My trip home that Monday night took over two hours rather than the usual 12 minutes. Mostly because of two such buses that were jacknifed (U Dist).

We know those buses have more problems than the regular buses. Metro allowing them to attempt travel makes life hellish for other drivers. Pull them over, you know what is going to happen!

Anonymous said...

I missed the opportunity to post a comment earlier.

This is more a Metro Transit problem than DOT: Articulated buses should be pulled to the side of the road and parked at the first sign of ice or snow. My trip home that Monday night took over two hours rather than the usual 12 minutes. Mostly because of two such buses that were jacknifed (U Dist).

We know those buses have more problems than the regular buses. Metro allowing them to attempt travel makes life hellish for other drivers. Pull them over, you know what is going to happen!

Nick said...

I just want to take this opportunity to say thank you. Despite quite a few problems and accidents, there is plenty of fault with drivers' inexperience with these weather conditions as there is with WSDOT's response to the storm. I've been in the Seattle area for about six years, moving from the Minneapolis area of Minnesota. The difference in response to weather in just the short time I've been here is astounding, and for a region that rarely experiences winter weather like what we just had, you did an impressive job. Keep up the good work.

Anonymous said...

I think that the WSDOT does a super job. The workers seem to do a fantastic job keeping traffic moving. If people would slow down a little and allow extra time,I'm sure it would help the WSDOT do their job faster too.

 

Featured Flickr Photo

see caption
I-90 bridge expansion joint replacement

Blog Archive